Here’s To: The Dead Letter by Finley Martin BOOK TOUR + REVIEW!!

THE DEAD LETTER (Anne Brown #2)
by Finley Martin

GENRE: Detective Fiction

PAGES: eBook, 354 pages

PUBLISHED: 2015, Acorn Press

SOURCE: copy provided

ORGANIZED BY: Worldwind Virtual Book Tours


 dead letter THE DEAD LETTER 

It is 2001 and the police constable’s girlfriend is murdered in a fit of jealous rage. When the constable realizes what he has done, he manages an elaborate cover-up. Only one person knows the truth. Flash forward to 2012. Anne Brown is still running her late uncle, Bill Darby’s, detective agency after spending four or five years as his assistant. One day, the postman delivers an eleven year-old letter. The letter is addressed to her uncle from a woman named Carolyn Jollimore. She says she has evidence about a murder and begs for help from Darby. But Bill Darby is dead. And when Anne looks up the letter’s author, she finds that Jollimare too is now dead. Troubled with the evidence at hand, Anne must decide if she should investigate this eleven-year old murder.

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 finley Finley Martin

Finley Martin was born in Binghamton, New York and grew up in Scranton, Pennsylvania.  He received a B.A. degree in English at the University of Scranton, and during the 1960’s he served as an officer with the United States Marine Corps at posts in America, the Caribbean, and Asia.

After he returned to civilian life, he worked as a free-lance writer, p.r. consultant, and photographer and became public relations director at International Correspondence Schools. In the 70’s he received an M.A. from the University of Ottawa and a B.Ed. from the University of Prince Edward Island.  For many years he taught English literature at high school and writing courses at university.  He has also worked as a truck driver, labourer, carpenter, boat builder, and deckhand aboard commercial fishing vessels and passenger ferries.

​During his writing career he published numerous magazine and newspaper articles, poetry, and short stories in Canada and the U.S.  He produced a mini-series for CBC Radio and has given numerous poetry readings. He authored three books: New Maritime Writing, Square Deal Pub., Charlottetown, PE; A View from the Bridge, Montague, PE; and The Reluctant Detective, The Acorn Press, Charlottetown, PE.

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 review

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I feel very lacking without having read the first book. 

 There’s that backstory I need to read. I need the first book the relationship with Dit is very suspicious.

Okay, I literally almost marked this as DNF-ed a long time ago and just started on it today and nothing much has changed…

Also, that ending is uncharacteristically heartbreaking.

Uncharacteristically because this book was dull at its best. Just putting the truth out there. I lacked feelings towards the book. Not that I didn’t have any feelings but this book was more of a calm read. The kind of book you read to pass time. To calm you down.

It sure falls under mystery but definitely not a thriller.

The writing was good but lacking when it comes to character-reader intimacy.

It was the kind of book that you read, not you live.

Sadly.

But anywaaayyyysss

I liked this book. Because of the dull atmosphere, I can’t say I thoroughly enjoyed it and that the climax was very climatic. Though, it was not surprising for me as it was one of my theories.

Taking a step back, this is a really good book. Anne was pretty much a confusing but good character. She’s driven and smart (usually) and she has a heart of gold. I really hope all the best for her. I hope her life makes a turn for the better because she deserves it. She’s kinda cool.

This book is kinda the story of everybody. The change in point-of-view is very much unpredictable and minutely confusing. But you’ll figure it all out before you get totally confused.

The Dead Letter flowed kinda too slowly for me but it was fine. The pace was what made this a chill-out-day kinda read. Like, a lazy Sunday kinda read. There were a couple of quotes lying around here and there.

This book held a lot of great factors. One, there’s the family legacy thing when it comes to Anne Brown/Billy Darcy business. Then Anne’s Jacqui. Then everybody , basically. As I said, this wasn’t just one person’s story. It was everybody’s story. It’s unique and confusing and amazing that way. Two is friendship. Although I’m not yet enlightened about the full background of their relationship, Dit and Anne’s friendship sounded pretty much of a treasure to me. Also hers and Ben’s. But what I really want to highlight is Jacqui and Rada’s. Three is, of course, the mystery. I love mysteries. Nowadays, it’ hard for me to find a mystery read that really had me searching in the dark but this one will surely shock people. It had that kind of plot line. Four, is the subtle romance.

I REALLY REALLY REALLY WANT ANNE TO HAVE A LOVE LIFE PLEASE THANKS.

Inform me once there’s another book and in that book, there better be more love for Anne. (Ehem*Dr. Little*Ehem)

Okay, Dr. Little is suspicious but anyway.

Overall, when it comes to friendships, race, religion, age, gender, shouldn’t be a line. That’s a heavy point in this book and just for that, I already love this. Generally, I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants a calm read. Although not everything that happened here is quite calm. It was slow paced but that doesn’t mean it’s not exciting. It’s not a thriller but there were sure times when I was just like: JUST TELL ME WHAT HAPPENED FNBOSJEFUDVVCK. The mystery is well played. The family factor is definitely precious. And the romance… left me sighing. All the good sighs.

In the end, A person has the ability to change. Never doubt that.

(That was a slight spoiler because someone there shouldn’t have… *spoiler*)

SIGH.

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